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More Visa Options for Tourism and Hospitality Workers

Due to Australia’s current international border closure hospitality and tourism businesses, who usually rely heavily on temporary workers such as working holiday makers, have struggled to find workers to fill positions.

The Australian Government will now provide more support for Australia’s tourism and hospitality sectors by providing more visa flexibility to temporary migrants in Australia.

International students working in the tourism and hospitality sector will be given unlimited work rights. A 40-hour fortnightly limit previously applied during study periods.

Furthermore, temporary visa holders working in, or with job offers in, tourism and hospitality will be able to apply for the Subclass 408 COVID-19 visa, and will be able to remain in Australia for up to an additional 12 months.

Please contact the migration team at Tang Law if you would like to know more.


About Writer

Sophie Manera is a Partner and Registered Migration Agent at Tang Law. She practices exclusively in immigration law. She is also the Vice-President of the Migration Institute of Australia’s Western Australia State Committee.

Sophie represents visa applicants, sponsors and businesses in lodging applications, attending to complex migration matters, making submissions to the Department of Home Affairs, and representing applicants in the tribunals and courts.

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Veterinarians Added to Department of Home Affairs’ Priority Migration Skilled Occupation List

The Migration Team at Tang Law are pleased to hear of the proposed addition of veterinarians to the Priority Migration Skilled Occupation List (PMSOL).

We understand there is substantial demand for skilled veterinarians nationally, and the Australian labour market is unable to fill these gaps.

Tang Law has substantial experience in assisting veterinarians and employers with finding suitable visa options.

We look forward to the Australian government adding this occupation to the PMSOL.


About Writer

Sophie Manera is a Partner and Registered Migration Agent at Tang Law. She practices exclusively in immigration law. She is also the Vice-President of the Migration Institute of Australia’s Western Australia State Committee.

Sophie represents visa applicants, sponsors and businesses in lodging applications, attending to complex migration matters, making submissions to the Department of Home Affairs, and representing applicants in the tribunals and courts.

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Federal Budget - Migration Planning Update

Australia Federal Budget 2020/21 – Migration Program Updates

Due to Covid-19 travel restrictions, the number of net overseas migration has been significantly affected in Australia. While net overseas migration was planned to be 271,300 this year, it is now expected to fall to just 35,000 in 2020-2021.

The Government is well aware of the positive impact which migration has on the Australian economy. The government has sought to address the impact which COVID-19 has had on the Australian economy by making some changes to the Australian Migration Program and Planning Levels. Below is a summary of the main factors that have been addressed in relation to Australian migration and the 2020 budget:

2020-2021 Migration Program Levels

The current cap of 160,000 will stay in place. However, there will be a focus on family stream visas with an increase from 47,732 places to 77,300. This will be applicable for the 2020-21 migration program only and can be expected to return to the lower cap next migration program.

Onshore visa applications and partner visa applicants whose sponsors live in designated reginal areas of Australia will be prioritised by the Department for the 2020-21 migration program.

The Employer Sponsored, Global Talent, and Business Innovation and Investment Program will have priority placed on the skilled streams for this year migration program.

Further information can be found at: https://immi.homeaffairs.gov.au/what-we-do/migration-program-planning-levels

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MISLEADING CASES IN PROPERTY DEVELOPMENT

In the recent years, we noticed a significant increase in number of cases involving misleading or deceptive conduct and breach of contract in property development projects.

Case Study

In one of our recent cases, our client is a successful business migrant from PRC and does not speak any English. Through a friend who lives in Australia, also from China, our client was introduced to a local property development company. The company introduced land subdivision project to our client stating that:

  1. Our client needs to only invest $920k into the project company.
  2. The return on investment is 20% per year
  3. The project will be completed in 2 years.

The friend was present at all meetings and was translating for our client.  Our client relied heavily on and trusted the friend.  The friend helped the company convince our client that the project is very profitable.  Our client ultimately invested $920m and flew back to China.  After almost 6 years, our client did not receive any money back from the company.

Australia Consumer Law

Under the Australia Consumer Law (“ACL”), previously known as the Trade Practices Act, a person is prohibited from engaging in conduct that is likely to mislead another person. Intention to mislead is not required!   What is “misleading conduct”?

  • Any promise or representation made, even though it may be true at that time, but became incorrect or untrue at a later stage is false and misleading for ACL purposes.
  • Any promises or representation about a future matter made without reasonable basis is also false and misleading for ACL purposes.

Back to our client’s case, all of the representations made by the company were false. Our client never received the 20% return on investment or any money from the investment.

Upon investigation, we found that the company has used the project company’s funds to invest into other projects without our client’s consent.  We also found that that the project company and the director of the project company own properties valued between $3.5 to $4m.

We commenced action in the Supreme Court of Western Australia against the project company, the Company, and the director personally, for “misleading or deceptive conduct” and for breach of contract, claiming in excess of $4m in loss or damages.

At the same time, we made a strategic move in applying to the Court and successfully freeze all the assets of the company and the director.

The case went to trial and the Court found in our client’s favour.  Our client received compensation of approximately $3.5m.

High Court Case

Misleading conduct” is one of the most commonly used legal ground to commence legal action.

In a High Court Case, Henville and Another v Walker and another (2001) 182 ALR 37, the appellants purchased a block of land to subdivide into smaller blocks. The representations made by the Respondent as to the anticipated selling prices of the subdivided blocks were substantially overestimated. The project was undertaken and the appellants suffered loss.

The High Court decided that the respondent’s misrepresentations contravened the Act and has caused loss sustained by the appellants.

Concluding Remark

If you suspect that you may lose your investment, you should act as soon as possible, before the company you invested in goes into financial trouble.  If the company is already in financial troubles, then we need to immediately search whether its directors and all persons involved in the misleading conduct to determine whether they have any assets.

The ACL has a very wide operation.  It catches every person who is involved in the misleading conduct and such person could become personally liable to compensate you for your loss sustained.

Also, there is a limitation period at law.  You will be barred from commencing legal action if you missed the limitation period.  Please do not wait if you suspect that your investment may be loss.


ABOUT THE WRITER

Kelvin Tang has over 14 years’ experience practising law in Western Australia. He is the founder and Principal Partner of Tang Law based in Perth, Western Australia. Kelvin is a Registered Migration Agent (MARN: 1386452) and has extensive experience in providing migration advice to clients, advising on “Eligible Businesses” within the definition of the Migration Regulations, assisting migrants (investor of the business) with satisfying migration requirements, making visa applications and appealing cancelled or refused visas in the Federal Court of Australia, Administrative Appeals Tribunal and Migration Review Tribunal. Kelvin also has extensive experience in civil litigation, commercial and corporate law matters.

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HOW TO IMPROVE YOUR SUCCESS RATE IN MIGRATION APPEAL

Appeal Statistics

In 2016-2017, migration appeal to the Administrative Appeal Tribunal (AAT) has increased substantially by 7,675 cases (up 41%) to a total of 26,604.

This is the highest number of applications since the establishment of the Migration Appeal Division. This suggests a significant increase in visa refusals and cancellations by the Department of Immigration.

Of the 26,604 total number of AAT appeal cases in 2017, it comprised of:

  • Partner visa – 4,001
  • Student Refusal – 4,418
  • Student Cancellation – 1,137
  • Nomination/Sponsor Approval – 2,067
  • Permanent Business – 1,007

Approximately 38% (i.e. less than half) of the cases finalised in 2017 was successful.  Where the case relates to refugee visa, only 11% was successful.

How To Increase Your Success Rate?

From our years of experience in successfully representing applicants in migration appeals, we have a proven method of substantially improving your chance of succeeding.

To stand a chance of succeeding, you must at least do the following.

Firstly, carefully review Immigration’s decision and formulate your grounds of appeal.

Applying to AAT for review is not just about filling in some forms, collating some documents or just writing a letter to the AAT.     You must know what grounds are there and which one of these grounds are applicable to your case and acceptable by AAT.  These grounds could be merits in nature or error of law.  You may need a lawyer who is experienced in migration law to help you with formulating these grounds.  In brief, you must know what the Tribunal is looking for.

Secondly, substantiate your ground with evidence.  You need to carefully consider what type of evidence would be convincing. You have to carefully reviewed every piece of evidence and tactfully put them together.  Your materials must not be inconsistent.   In short, you must provide the Tribunal with what they are looking for.

Thirdly, strengthen your appeal with past case law.  AAT is a quasi-judicial body.  The Tribunal member is bound by past decisions of the AAT or a higher court (e.g. the Federal Court).  The key here is to find past cases relevant specifically to your situation and use it to support your grounds.  In all, you must know the process and the framework in which the Tribunal must follow


ABOUT THE WRITER

Kelvin Tang has over 14 years’ experience practising law in Western Australia. He is the founder and Principal Partner of Tang Law based in Perth, Western Australia. Kelvin is a Registered Migration Agent (MARN: 1386452) and has extensive experience in providing migration advice to clients, advising on “Eligible Businesses” within the definition of the Migration Regulations, assisting migrants (investor of the business) with satisfying migration requirements, making visa applications and appealing cancelled or refused visas in the Federal Court of Australia, Administrative Appeals Tribunal and Migration Review Tribunal. Kelvin also has extensive experience in civil litigation, commercial and corporate law matters.

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